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Tuesday, December 22, 2009

How to Plan - Prepare and Travel Comfortably With Your Pets

By Niki Tudge

Whether you are traveling by air, car, train or foot, carefully consider the needs of your pet and thoroughly review the options available to you and plan accordingly. You should always consider your pet's health, safety and preferences when deciding whether to take your pet with you or leave them home with a qualified pet sitter. If your pet becomes anxious, motion-sick or does not enjoy new and different situations, especially older dogs, then the best choice is often to leave them at home where they feel safe, secure and comfortable.

Always do what is best for your pet. If air travel is involved, then leaving pets at home with a good pet sitter is usually the preferred option. When you do travel with your pet, deciding what to take is always a good place to start. Depending on the mode of travel and the length of the trip, you will need to pack any necessary medications and medical records, especially if your pet has chronic health problems or is currently under a veterinarian's care for an ailment. And the appropriate paperwork is essential if your travels take you across international borders (see the links below for specific requirements).

Then you will need the basics like food, food/water bowl, pet first aid kit, bed, leash, collar, required tags (ID and rabies), and grooming tools if your dog requires regular grooming, pet waste bags, crate, and toys (especially an interactive or chew toy that will keep them entertained). You will also need litter and a litter tray or disposable litter trays for your cat. Just in case, take a recent photograph along. It will be much easier to locate your pet if it becomes separated from the family if you have a photo to show people. And if your pet has an embedded ID chip you will need to have the phone number of the company and your account details so you can immediately contact them.

Your pet should have its own bag so you know where everything is and can grab items when you need them. Don't forget to carry some water if traveling by car, and remember to take enough of your dog's regular food for the entire trip. If you can't find the same brand on the road, abruptly changing a dog's diet can cause stomach upset and diarrhea, something to be avoided while traveling. It is always best to stick to their regular feeding schedule as well.

If you are traveling by car and your pet is unaccustomed to car travel, begin preparing in advance of any long trips by first getting your pet comfortable in the car and then take it on several local trips of increasing duration. This will help minimize the risk of motion-sickness and help it become accustomed to car travel. If your pet appears to be prone to motion sickness consult your vet. Your dog should never be allowed to ride in the passenger seat, on your lap or allowed to run loose in a moving car.

Always use either a crate or one of the available safety harnesses or other barrier systems to restrain your pets. Restraining your pet is as important to their safety as buckling up is to yours. Some states even require restraints on pets in a moving vehicle. Restraining your pet serves the same purpose as our seatbelts; they help protect your pet in the event of an accident and they keep them from distracting the driver or jumping out an open window. Restraining your pet also maintains control of your pet when you stop for gas or a snack.

Crate-training your pet at home pays big dividends while traveling Not only does the crate provide a safe place for your pet while traveling when secured to the seat or floor of the vehicle, but your pet will feel at home, safe and secure in their comfortable crate wherever your travels take you. And crates are the most effective way of restraining cats and small dogs in a moving vehicle. Your local pet store will carry a variety of styles, sizes and makes.

For larger dogs, or if your pet prefers, there are also pet restraints available that work with your car seat belts or cordon off part of your vehicle. There are a wide variety of styles and types including harnesses, seat belt attachments, car booster seats, and screens and netting that create an internal barrier in your vehicle. Whichever method you choose, make sure it fits your pet and car, is comfortable and your pet will tolerate wearing it for hours at a time. And keep your pet's head inside the car window to avoid eye injuries. Stop every two hours; this is advisable for you as well as your pets. Stretch your legs and take a walk. Be a responsible pet owner and don't forget the pet waste bags and antibacterial wipes. Finally, never leave your pet alone in a parked car. They may attract thieves and can easily become overheated and distressed even on a cool day.

Traveling by air is always stressful for an animal so visit your vet well in advance of the planned trip to make sure your pet is physically fit and don't fly your pet unless it's absolutely necessary. But if you must, always check with the specific airline carrier and ask about all regulations (see the websites below for more information). Find out what their requirements are including quarantine periods at your destination and if your pet qualifies to ride in the cabin or must be sent as checked baggage. You will need to determine the container requirements, check-in times and health documentation needs as well. Always use a good quality container in good condition; many mishaps occur every year from pets traveling in damaged or poor quality containers.

If your pet must travel as checked luggage use a direct flight and travel on the same plane as your pet. Don't travel when temperatures are forecast to be above 85 degrees F or below 45 degrees F. When you book your flight ask the airline if you will be allowed to watch your pet being loaded and unloaded and when you check-in, request that you be allowed to do this. After you've boarded, notify the Captain and the head flight attendant that your pet is in the cargo area. If your flight departure is delayed or has to taxi for longer than normal, ask that they check the temperature in the cargo area and report back to you.

Even if you know that your pet is a nervous flyer it is not advisable in most situations to use sedatives to calm them. According to the American Humane Society and the American Veterinary Medical Association, sedatives for air travel are not recommended because it is much more difficult for an animal to regulate their body temperature and maintain their balance and equilibrium if they've been sedated. Because of the altitude and temperature of a plane's cargo area pets that fly in the cargo area are also more susceptible to respiratory and cardiovascular problems if sedated.

Before any trip get your pet's papers and medications in order. Learn about the area you will be visiting in case there are diseases or hazards foreign to you and your pets. Your veterinarian can give you advice if you will need any additional vaccinations or medications. Have your vet perform a routine examination on your pet. Get any required legal travel documents (for air travel, contact the airlines for specifics that you'll need to give to your vet), make sure your pet's vaccinations are up-to-date, and get any medications your pet might need during the trip.

If you're giving your pet medication specifically for travel test them on your pet several days before you travel to ensure the dosage is accurate and that there are no adverse side effects. Depending on where you've been, another examination by your vet after your trip might be a good idea to check for parasites such as, roundworms, tape worms, hookworms, heartworms, ticks and fleas, that were picked up while you were away.

If you are traveling overseas there are very strict and detailed regulations for transporting pets. Be sure to follow the vaccination requirements exactly. You don't want your family pet to undergo any unnecessary quarantine periods. Pets are an important part of the family so be sure to take the time to plan and properly prepare them for the family vacation. By planning ahead and knowing what to pack, what to expect, and what to do each step of the way, you will ensure that your pet has a safe and stress-free holiday.

The DogSmith was founded in 1998 by Niki Tudge, a leading proponent of positive animal training techniques. The DogSmith mission is to enhance the lives of pets and their owners by improving their relationship and the quality of the life they share, through; 1. Providing professional support and training to Pet Dog owners, 2. Supporting and assisting animal shelters and rescue organizations to minimize the number of unwanted animals and 3. Offering affordable and professional care for family pets.

To learn more about the DogSmith and their ARRF (R) and MTR (R) methodologies visit http://www.888DogSmith.com

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Have You Considered Being a Dog Or Cat Foster Parent?

By Jeannette McQueen-Nobbs

Have you considered being an animal Foster Parent? This is a great way to help animal rescue associations save many animals lives. Animals that you foster parent are so grateful to be rescued. There are many rescue groups that you can find on Petfinder.com. They are listed under shelters and you can find an animal shelter that's in your area. When I searched through the animals on the Petfinder website they have ads placed asking people to foster parent animals and you can download an application form there to fill out and then apply to do this work. The rescue groups will make an appointment with you and come to visit you at your home. They will need to go through your home to make sure it is safe for the animal to come into.

Once you are approved you will be notified when a dog or cat is available for you to take care of. Make sure that the rescue group knows what size of dog is best for you and how many you can take in your home. They will arrange you getting the dog and what supplies you'll need to look after them. Each rescue has their own policies so make sure you're clear on them.

Most rescue dogs do not come from good circumstances and have emotional or behavioral concerns so you will need to be very patient with them. Keep the dog on a leash when you first take them out for a walk or to see the new home that they are in, as you don't know if they will run away. Take off the leash once they are inside your home. Slowly introduce them to your other pets so that you don't frighten him. You will have to watch him all the time for the first few days unless you have a pet crate to put them in. You can leave the pet crate door opened when he's not confined so he can go there to feel safe when he needs to.

The rescue will contact you to find out information about the dog or cat. If the dog has some issues that's okay as we can work on it. Just love him and train him so he will become a great dog. One day the rescue will contact you to arrange a meeting with a future adoptive family. Some dog foster parents may want to meet their foster dog's future adopters because they have become attached to the dog. The foster parent can answer questions about the animal better as they've taken care of them. It will be difficult to let the animal go to the new adopters home but there are so many other little dogs or cats that you can foster parent and help save their lives too. There are many animals out there that need a safe, warm place to stay until the rescue group can find them a permanent home with a loving family.

Jeannette McQueen-Nobbs or Queenie1 has written some articles and was published. She has also written an eBook.

Her blogs are:
http://petsweecare.blogspot.com
http://ancestrynme.blogspot.com

 

Saturday, November 7, 2009

How to Banish the Smell of Dog Or Cat Pee For Good

By Laurel R. Lindsay

If your cat or dog has peed on your carpet you know how difficult it is to get rid of the lingering smell of cat or dog urine. Cleaning cat urine can be quite a challenge. Don't waste a lot of money trying different urine removers. You can make your own cat urine cleaner using ingredients you most likely have already in your home. You can deodorize and clean cat and pet urine odors and stains from your carpets and rugs using common household products.

When a cat pees on rugs, carpets or furnishings it can leave a very unpleasant distinctive cat smell that is hard to get rid of. This urine odor stimulates the cat to urinate in that area again thus perpetuating the problem. Once you remove the odor permanently the cat will no longer keep going back to the same area to re-offend.

Dog owners also have problems from dog urine smells on furnishings and carpets.

A puppy can have many accidents on the floor before they are house trained or an incontinent older dog can leave dribbles of urine on the carpet. This free homemade recipe works just as well on dog urine as it does on cat urine. It will also work to remove human urine odor.

Recipe to get rid of cat pee and dog pee smells forever:

Ingredients:

3% Hydrogen Peroxide
Baking Soda
Dish Soap
White Vinegar

Directions:

If the cat has recently urinated on the carpet, first absorb as much of the urine as possible using paper towels or old towel. Place a clean paper towels overt the cat urine area and tread on them so as to absorb as much of the urine as possible. Repeat with dry towels until no more moisture can be absorbed. If the cat urine has dried and you are not sure where the soiled area is you can use a black light to detect it. In a darkened room the black light will pick up urine and other stains.

Learn how to sell your own house here: For Sale By Owner Find even more resources for FSBO here: FSBO Sellers Packages.

If you're looking to buy a home from an FSBO listing check here: FSBO Listings

Monday, November 2, 2009

Remove Rust Stains From Carpet and Upholstery

By Robert Torres

Rust can be tricky because you can not remove it with just plain soap and water. The strongest alkaline based detergents in the world and hours of scrubbing will not do anything more than destroy the carpet that underlies that annoying rust stain. There is an easier way and it doesn't have to be so hard. Here's how...

To understand how to remove rust you need to know the simple solution to rust removal - that's acid. Don't get to excited about the word acid. We eat acidic things all of the time - citrus acid for example. In fact, nearly all foods that we eat are acidic. We'll start our rust stain removal with a mild remedy and work our way up to slightly more aggressive remedies. We'll begin with lemons. Lemons are obviously acidic and will work great on most rust stains. I want you to follow the regular cleaning methods when applying all of these methods. To be clear on this, be sure to always apply solution, agitate with a metal spoon, rinse with cold water, and blot dry. After applying the lemon liberally onto the rust, agitate the lemon into the carpet fibers with  a metal spoon. Let the lemon sit for one hour. Then rinse and dry.

If the rust stain remains, try cream of tarter. Mix the cram of tarter with a little bit of water to create a paste. Do not dilute the cream of tarter too much with water. We are looking for a fairly paste-like consistency. Apply, agitate using a metal spoon, and let sit for one hour. Rinse and dry.

Still no luck? Switch over to vinegar. I know it smells but I'll give you an easy remedy to get rid of the odor. Proceed to complete the same process as you did with both the lemon and the cream of tarter until you are successful with complete rust removal. Then throw on some baking soda to neutralize the acidity of the vinegar. The odor will be gone, hopefully along with the rust stain.

Robert Torres the owner of Steam Pro New York Carpet Cleaning. See the original rust removal article at Rust Stain Removal

Friday, October 30, 2009

Why It's Important to Choose the Right Animal Hospital For Your Pet

By Adan C Hayden

Choosing the right animal hospital for your pet is very important for their health as well as your peace of mind. This article will cover some of the things you should look for in an animal hospital if you're looking for a veterinary care provider for your pet. Knowing how to compare animal hospitals can help you to make a good decision about where you should bring your pet when they're in need of medical care.

The first step is to ask family, friends and colleagues where they take their pets for veterinary care. It can be a challenge to find the right animal hospital for your pet; if you live in a rural area, there may not be a lot of choices. In a large city, you may have dozens of different animal hospitals to choose from. In both cases, this can make it difficult to decide on the right hospital. The opinions of other pet owners who have had their pet cared for at a particular animal hospital are the best source of information about the level of care given. Both positive and negative views are good to know; after all, you don't want your companion animal being given anything but the best possible care.

Secondly, here are a few basic guidelines if you need to choose a good animal hospital. Ask to see the veterinarian's license and start by asking if there is a registered veterinary technician on staff at the animal hospital. Doing this means that you have qualified staff working there, for example, a registered veterinary technician has passed the regulated state tests for all vets: education is essential because a registered technician will have the experience and skills that are prerequisites for required proper pet treatment and examinations. Please note: you should only allow a registered per technician to treat you pet and administer shots and pills (almost all animal hospitals will have non-registered employees working for them).

You should meet with the veterinarian before making your decision as well. Ask about their experience as a veterinarian, including how long they've been providing health care to animals. It's your decision how many years of experience you want your vet to have, but in general the longer they've been practicing, the more confident you can feel about having them care for your pet.

One thing to take note of is if the vet's license is a permanent license; a temporary license indicates that you're talking to an intern rather than a fully licensed vet. You probably don't want to have someone who's not even finished with their education taking care of your pet. Ask the veterinarian what the vet techs on staff at the hospital do in the course of their work, for example what their duties and responsibilities are there.

You should always ask when visiting an animal hospital what veterinary services are offered at the hospital. For example, do they offer urgent care - and if so, what hours are these services offered? Does the hospital perform surgeries and other more complex health care services? Does the hospital offer services like training for puppies and dogs? Does the hospital provide dietary and nutritional services? How about geriatric pet care?

Check if the hospital has a website and if so, what information about the hospital and its staff is provided there. Remember that just calling an establishment an animal hospital says nothing about the quality of care they provide there. If you may need emergency veterinary care, you'll want to be sure that the animal hospital's care and services are of the highest quality. If your family, friends or co-workers don't have any recommendations for you, you can find a good animal hospital by touring different ones and asking plenty of questions.

You should always tour any animal hospital you're thinking of taking your pets to when you go there to interview the veterinarian. Pay especially close attention to the cleanliness of examination rooms and surgical areas. These should be as clean and sterile as at any hospital for humans; check for debris on the floor or dirt under tables. A good animal hospital will also seem well organized and free of unpleasant odors beyond the smell you'd expect in a building which sees visits from a lot of animals. Any out of the ordinary smells can be a sign that the sanitation in the animal hospital is not up to par and that you may want to keep looking for somewhere to provide your pet with veterinary care.

These guidelines can help you to make a better decision when choosing an animal hospital for your pet's care. Get a referral if possible, listen to the opinions of others who have taken their pets there, make sure they are properly licensed, find out the roles of the staff within the hospital and speak to the veterinarian while touring the hospital. This should give you the information you need to decide on the best animal hospital in your area to care for your pets health.

If you are searching for a Animal Hospital Apple Valley MN than look no further then Crossroads Animal Hospital. Crossroads Animal Hospital are experts in their field, Here is more information on a Animal Hospital Apple Valley Minnesota.

Monday, October 26, 2009

Neutering and Spaying - Part of Total Ferret Care

By Seth Evans

Neutering or spaying processes are generally applied as part of administering total ferret care. Spaying female ferrets does prevent illnesses caused by excessive heat. On the other hand, neutering male ferrets does prevent the so called unwanted ferret smell.

Ferrets do become sensitive if subjected to adverse conditions such as heat. Many owners opt to have their ferrets either spayed or neutered before bringing them into their place. Shelters also advise these processes as essentials of ferret care. For these individuals, neutering or spaying ferrets prevent these pets from being ill or getting sick.

There are occasions wherein adopted or bought ferrets are not necessarily spayed or neutered. Most common causes include buying domestic ferrets directly from breeders. Additional cost is also prevented since some pet shops do sell intact ferrets. On the other hand, first-time owners tend to ask, "What are the benefits of neutering or spaying your ferret?" Below are stated reasons and guidelines.

1. When female ferrets or jills reach the age of four months, the so called 'heat cycle' so begins. This cycle will continuously go on unless she undergoes protection. This process is aptly called a Jill jab. As a component of female ferret care, Jill Jabs are given to create an interruption in the heat cycle, thus allowing hormones to work.

There are instances wherein owners substitute Jill Jabs in place of spaying. However, it is strongly suggested not to do so since spaying has long-term benefits. Furthermore, a Jill Jab is also given to prepare a female ferret for spaying.

2. Neutering processes, meanwhile, are part of male ferret care. Neutering is also recognized to affect male ferrets' behavior such as nipping and biting.

3. Ferret odor is also prevented if male ferrets are neutered. While the procedure may not totally get rid of ferret odor, it will somehow help in lessening such smell.

4. Neutering or castration should also be performed once your male ferret reaches the age of four months. It is also strongly suggested to avail of the procedure before your pet reaches four months.

Neutering or spaying your ferrets does affect the sexual nature of your pets. For some, these ferret care procedures aid them in lessening problems and other ferret diseases. While these ideas may be true, the fact remains that total ferret care does not only involve medicines and food. For in the long run, you have to consider your pet's well-being and overall condition.

Want More? Get Your FREE Secrets to Having a Healthy, Happy, Well-Behaved and Long Lived Ferret Mini eCourse:

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Seth Evans is ferret enthusiast, if you would like more great information on Ferret Care please visit http://www.ferrets-as-pets.com/ Don't forget to claim your FREE eCourse!

How to Breed Superworms

By Sebastian Hayward

As your collection of animals has grown you have undoubtedly thought about breeding your own feeder insects. If you have been buying superworms week after week and are wondering how to breed them yourself you have come to the right place.

Constantly running to the local shop or ordering your feeders online becomes quite a chore after a short while. Breeding superworms yourself is not only cost effective but a lot of fun.

The first step in breeding superworms successfully is learning how to raise them. Healthier larvae will pupate with less problems and thus in turn become healthier and livelier beetles.

Once you can sustain a colony of healthy larvae then it is time to try your hand at getting them to breed.

There are a few things that cause confusion for most people when trying to breed their superworms.

The very first thing to note about breeding superworms is that they will not pupate and then turn into beetles if kept together as one usually does with mealworms. Unlike mealworms who will complete their life cycles and breed together all in the same container, superworms like to be left alone when it comes to becoming a pupa. When your larvae is grown you are going to have to separate each one into its own little enclosure.

A common method of doing so is to use film canisters to temporarily house each worm. Tackle boxes or screw boxes work equally well. Separate each superworm into its own little home. Once separated the larvae will eventually stop all activity, curl into a c-shape, slowly turn into a pupa, and then transform into a beetle all in the same small enclosure. This process will take a couple weeks, but it is quite fun to watch.

Once your larvae have completed their transformations you are going to have a lot of hungry and thirsty beetles on your hands. Take all of your new beetles and place them together into a container such as a Rubbermaid container with a secure lid. Additionally, line your Rubbermaid container with a substrate of wood shavings. Your beetles will need a source of water and food. Potatoes or apples work very well for hydration, and moistened dry dog food works well for a food source. The added protein in the dog food will help with egg laying.

Keep your beetles at a temperature of around 80 degrees. Maintain their enclosure's humidity with regular misting. Do not overlook giving your beetles a place to lay their eggs. This simple mistake can cause you to scratch your head months from now wondering why you never managed to get your superworm beetles to breed. A piece of cork bark laid across the substrate works nicely. Without this your beetles may lay their eggs in the substrate which can be eaten by other beetles.

In a few weeks you should be seeing very tiny wiggling worms at the bottom of your substrate.

Friday, October 23, 2009

Advances in Treatment and Prevention of Cat and Dog Infestations

By Andre Hansen

Fleas and ticks have much less chance of success than ever before thanks to advances in treatment and prevention of cat and dog infestations by fleas. There is now no longer a need to spread powder all over a distressed animal or its owner. Frontline Plus offers compelling reasons to leave the older ways and awkward means behind.

For a product like FP best price may not seem to compare until one looks at effectiveness and frequency of application factors.

The different varieties of the product that are targeted for either cats or dogs of varying sizes use Fipronil and (S)-methoprene. The people who make FP promise that every flea alive on an animal treated with their product will be eliminated in about half a day. Significantly, a female flea must inhabit a host for 24 hours before she can lay her eggs and commence a new reproductive cycle. The product doesn't nip flea infestations in the bud it nips them in the eggs.

FP kills all the ticks, if any, in about 48 hours. For thirty days thereafter your pet will be free of both fleas and ticks. Along with staying effective the product is waterproof. Keep a treated animal from getting wet until the application area appears dry, about 24 hours.

FP should be applied between the shoulder blades of a cat or a dog. It is powerful medication; follow the directions carefully. It spreads through a pet's fur and over its skin using translocation, a completely natural process.

In fact, the product behaves just like a pet's natural oils collecting in its oils glands, then spreading out gradually and getting "wicked" around the fur and skin.

It may not seem fair, but FP's availability and a FP best price are controlled carefully by veterinary professionals in many areas.

Andre Hansen writes articles for Home and Lifestyle improvements besides writing for Pet Grooming and Care. You can find more information about flea and tick treatment at http://www.bestpricefrontlineplus.com, where you can read about Best Price Frontline Plus.

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Goals of Cancer Treatment in Pets

By William Greenbaum

If your pet develops cancer, what should be your treatment goals?

In this article I'd like to share with you what cancer is and then discuss the different therapy options available, and then conclude with what your treatment goals should be.

Lets begin with a description of this insidious disease. Cancer is essentially cells going wild. It is the unrestrained growth of cells that destroy healthy tissues and body organs. There are many forms of cancer and each of them have different outcomes.

Your vet can choose to surgically remove the tumor or begin radiation therapy -- which are two common treatments, and expensive. Other therapy options include: chemotherapy, pain relief, complementary therapies including vitamins and nutritional supplements, homeopathics, biologicals, acupuncture, herbal remedies or a combination of therapies. Each case is different and there are stress factors (on both people and pets) as well as costs that often determine a course of action. The course of the disease is often unpredictable so essentially the goal of treatment is to:

  1. Slow down the illness
  2. Prolong life
  3. Make your pet as comfortable and happy as possible
Conventional treatment options

1. Surgery - recommended only if there is a good chance of removing enough of the tumor to boost quality of life.

2. Radiation - can work for certain types of tumors. Not without risks and complications. Speak to your vet.

3. Chemotherapy - has a good success rate with lymphoma in dogs and cats, and with some other cancers. For many cancers, it has little or no benefit.

4. Appetite Stimulants - Weight loss is a huge issue. No food, no nutrition, and the immune system goes south faster than a duck in winter. There are a number of different medications on the market that help increase your pet's appetite. Use these medications at the first sign of decreased appetite rather than delaying until significant weight loss has occurred. It is much easier to maintain weight then it is to gain it back after it's been lost.

5. Pain Medication - as quality of life is the top priority, seek advice from your veterinarian and likely you will have to buy prescriptions.

6. Acupuncture - this holistic treatment is increasingly popular in cancer treatment. Acupuncture for pets is now recognized as a specialists degree from the American Holistic Veterinarian's Association. About 300 vets graduate each year with an advanced degree, but be that as it may, acupuncture does have a downside. It will stimulate the body's systems and may backfire and cause tumor growth.

Holistic pet treatments

1. Supplements - should be a part of everyday pet health and life-long therapy. Refined pet foods most often lack the vital nutrients required and the reason for this is that they are leached out during the manufacturing process -- much like our foods have been for decades and now look at the huge incidences of cancer in society! Okay back to supplements. One more thing, if your pet is difficult to pill or won't accept a supplement mixed with food, these many not be practical.

2. Digestive Enzymes - anything that will help your pet get the most out of its food is a requirement whilst your pet is suffering from cancer. Digestive enzymes breakdown carbs, fats, proteins and make the food and its nutrients more bio-available to the body. This is good. It is in fact, vital.

3. Pet Vitamins - he or she needs pet vitamins! Specifically pet vitamins A, C and E -- of which are all antioxidants and have a number of anti-cancer effects, including the inhibition of blood vessel growth in tumors, the promotion of healthy collagen, and free radical scavengers.

4. Herbal Remedies -- are potent antioxidants that also serve to stabilize cells, as well as detox the liver and boost the immune system. They have proven themselves to be effective as they have been in use by over 200 holistic veterinarians for over 10 years.

5. Omega-3 Fish Oils for Pets - are rich in EFA's (essential fatty acids) specifically EPA and DHA -- which have been shown clinically to reduce inflammation by promoting the production of natural anti-inflammatory substances in the body. They also help your pet with energy and can slow tumor growth.

6. Marijuana oil (a legal form) for pets -- is a good source of Omega-3s and has the additional advantage of improving appetite.

7. Essiac Formula -- this herbal remedy is an immune booster and an antioxidant.

8. Protein Rich Diet -- a good quality protein in the diet is tasty and the easiest for the body to process. High quality proteins include real meat, poultry and fish, and better quality canned food. Simple carbohydrates should be eliminated from the diet if possible -- or reduced. Simple carbohydrates include sugar, milk, fruit and kibble (dry pet food). Complex carbohydrates (starchy vegetables) should be reduced in quantity.

When is veterinary attention required?

Please contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following:

  • decrease in appetite
  • weight loss
  • increase or decrease in drinking or in urinating
  • urinating or defecating in an inappropriate location
  • straining when passing stool or urine
  • stool that is dry or hard or constipation
  • vomiting
  • change in behavior (ie. withdrawing, becoming aggressive)
  • decrease in energy
  • a sore that does not heal
  • an unusual odor
Same day veterinary attention is required if you notice any of the following:

  • if your pet stops drinking and urinating
  • if your pet hasn't eaten for 24 hours
  • if your pet is extremely lethargic or is having difficulty walking
  • if your pet is in pain
  • if your pet vomits more than 3 times in a 24 hour period.
As mentioned earlier the primary goal of a pet with cancer is 'quality and dignity of life.' To be honest, quality of life is difficult to measure in animals, however some of the factors to consider are appetite, activity and energy levels, grooming habits and finally sociability around other animals. When your pet's quality of life is no longer adequate and treatment options have been exhausted, humane euthanasia is recommended.

William Greenbaum hails from Ferndale, WA and Vancouver, B.C. He is an outdoor guy, avid sportsman, triathlete, cyclist, dog lover, poet, nature photographer and spiritualist. William's passions in life are kids, sports, the arts and business. He has been an entrepreneur all his life with three careers - reporter, theater producer and CEO. He is the Founder of All Pet Naturals -- an alternative natural medicine company specializing in the pet industry, and providing pet owners with the finest holistic line of herbal and homeopathic remedies on the market today.

Pet Vaccines - Are You Helping Your Pet Or Hurting It?

By Becky Kimes

Every responsible pet caretaker wants to take the best possible care of their companion. This includes preventative care including a proper vaccination schedule.

Once animals are given their core vaccines they are typically given a yearly booster. In the case of horses, a twice per year booster is usually recommended.

Have you ever wondered why people get vaccinated only as children for most diseases, yet animals need to be re-vaccinated every year, sometimes twice a year, for life?

For years now holistic veterinarians have voiced objections to yearly vaccines. However long practiced habits and routines are hard to break.

Recently there has been much scientific evidence showing that yearly vaccines could be hurting your pet more than helping it.

The practice of vaccinating pets began in the 1950s when rabies and distemper were all to common and very lethal. At that time, little was understood about the natural immune system of animals and vaccines were in their infant stages.

Today our understanding of the immune system has vastly improved. In addition, the potency of vaccines has increased immensely. For example, many vaccines are now available for dogs and cats which protect against six or seven viruses in a single shot.

To understand how vaccines affect your animal you must first consider how they work. Essentially vaccines deliver antigens, something that the body considers an invading organism, into your pets body. This stimulates the body's immune system which produces specific antibodies or protection against the foreign antigens.

Yearly boosters can easily over-stress your pet's immune system. Especially since today's vaccines introduce multiple antigens (protection for different diseases) all at the same time. If your pet's immune system is currently fighting some sort of problem like an ear infection or allergy it is all too easy to cause more problems than you are trying to prevent.

Evidence of over-stressed pet immune systems is increasing. Today dog allergies are the number one cause of veterinarian visits. An allergy is simply a misguided immune system. For example, if you dog is allergic to corn, it isn't the corn that's the problem. The problem is that your pet's immune system thinks corn is an antigen and is "properly" responding to the invader.

In the mid-1990s, cats began developing malignant tumors between their shoulder blades--right where they are typically vaccinated. The correlation is all too clear.

Current research shows that the immunity created from a vaccination shot lasts 3-4 years. So why are some veterinarians still recommending yearly boosters?

Vaccines are an important tool in disease prevention and keeping your pet healthy. However it is your responsibility and right to have a candid conversation with your veterinarian about creating a vaccination schedule that properly supports your pet's health.

Becky Kimes is a Divine Animal Healer and Pet Loss Grief Recovery Coach. If your pet is suffering from a poor immune system or plagued with allergies Becky can help. Visit her at http://divinehealingforanimals.com and schedule a complimentary 15 minute consultation to discover how she can help your pet return to optimal health.

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Traveling by Car With Your Pet Rabbit? 3 Great Tips to Ease the Ride

By Nathalie Veilleux

If you are planning a long ride or a move and you are taking your pet rabbit with you, there are several things you have to consider. Traveling by car with your pet rabbit may not be as easy as you think if you never made him travel before. There are at least 3 facts you must know about before you made that decision.

Traveling can stressed out your rabbit Most rabbit will not enjoy long rides because of all the stress that being in a car will be giving them. If you absolutely have to take your rabbit on a long trip, you need a good size pet carrier to put him in. Put a towel on the bottom and bring plenty more to change them later along with food, hay and a bottle of water. Also take plenty of fresh vegetables and extra food for a long ride.

Rabbits are sensitive to overheating If you are planing on traveling in the summer months, remember to never leave the rabbit in the car while you stop, even if it is only for a quick one. Rabbits can overheat very easily and in just for a few minutes, they can suffocate and die. If your car does not have air conditioned, prepare in advance some frozen bottles of water that you put in the carrier wrapped in small towels so the rabbit can lean against them to cool off.

Take time to get him out to exercise If you will be traveling for several days in a row, get your rabbit out every night and take him in the motel room with you. Lay a large towel on the bathroom floor and install his litter box, food and water. Put the pet carrier on the doorway with the open door facing the bathroom and let him out so you can go for dinner without worrying about him destroying anything.

Remember that if your pet is not used to it, traveling by car with your pet rabbit could be risky. Some bunnies can get really stressed out and stop eating for over 24 hours, witch could be dangerous for their lives. Unless you have no other choice, if you are moving for example, it would be safer for your little friend to find him a keeper while you are going away.

I hope you found this information helpful about traveling by car with your pet rabbit. Do you know what kind of toys rabbits enjoy the most? Feel free to visit my blog at http: http://www.petrabbitcare.blogspot.com for a lot more free tips and videos and enjoy learning about your pet rabbit!

Sunday, October 18, 2009

What is Pet Dander? - Is There a Quick Fix?

By J Rodgers

Did you recently discover you were allergic to a pet? Perhaps you were told that pet dander was the culprit behind your allergies. What is pet dander? Is it an unnatural condition, a disease, a sign that something is wrong? Why does it affect you so? More importantly, is there anything you can do about it?

What is Pet Dander?

First of all, pet dander is completely natural and normal for your pet. It is nothing more than the dead skin cells that slough off from day to day. In fact, every living thing with skin, including you, renews skin cells and loses old ones continuously.

So there is nothing to fear. Neither is there anything you can do to stop it.

But how can you alleviate the problem caused by it, your allergies.

What Can You Do About Pet Dander?

Misinformation abounds. Some articles on the web would have you believe that choosing a short haired pet over a long haired one makes a difference. Hair length does not matter. It is the dead skin cells that concern us.

Allergy relief will depend upon your minimizing this residue. How? Here are the key ways:

  • Wash your pet regularly, at least every two weeks
  • Remove carpeting that can trap pet dander
  • Keep your pet out of the bedroom, you should have your own "safe room"
  • Improve ventilation through open windows if at all possible
Some people also find success regularly vacuuming surfaces with a HEPA vacuum cleaner. Keep in mind though that many vacuum cleaners that feature a HEPA filter do not pass 100% of the air through the filter but allow it to bypass. This simply aerosolizes the allergen just as a non-HEPA vacuum cleaner would and may only make matters worse.

Reducing airborne pet dander by means of an air purifier is another tactic. It may especially be of help in the bedroom, providing clean air that helps you get a good nights rest. Adequate sleep is one of the factors in your allergic response.

In choosing an air purifier for allergy relief go with one that features a true HEPA filter and total system efficiency very close to the HEPA standard.

Two excellent resources featuring both the high quality vacuum cleaners mentioned above as well as effective allergy relief air purifiers are achoo!Allergy.com and AllergyBuyersClub.com.

If you would like to know even more about how you can review, compare and buy the best rated indoor air purifiers in a few easy steps, I invite you to personally take advantage of free, instant access to the air purifier information available at http://www.home-air-purifier-guide.com

 
Article by J Alan Rodgers, the Air Purifier Expert.

Friday, October 16, 2009

The Zhu Zhu Pets Hamster Funhouse

By Dave Tee

There are amazing sales for Zhu Zhu pet hamsters and they are getting harder
to find. The high street is now not really the best place to go to try to
find them. The problem is that so many of the stores are only being given
limited stock and it is flying off the shelves.

This is especially true for the Zhu Zhu pets funhouse. This is the number
one addition to all the many hamsters that can be bought. The funhouse gives
them their own home to live in and there are extra rooms that can be added.
This is a complete environment for them to run around in and the fact that
there are extras such as slides and even a garage means that this is the
first step to creating a massive hamster environment.

When placed inside the Zhu pets are intelligent enough to move from room to
room and they even make different noises depending on the room they are in.
This makes them great fun for the kids and they can interact with their pets
a little more like they would with real hamsters. The Zhu Zhu funhouse with
Patches is one of the few ways to get this rare hamster as he is not sold
separately like the others.

If you want patches the hamster then this is one of the few ways to get him
and you also get the massive funhouse for him to interact with. The house
has a bedroom and a kitchen and even a bathroom so it is a great start to
building a massive environment for them to play in.

For cheap Zhu Zhu Pets and the Zhu Zhu Pets Funhouse please visit the
Zhu Zhu pet hamsters site.

Send instant messages to your online friends http://asia.messenger.yahoo.com

Monday, October 12, 2009

Abandoned, Abused Animals - Become Animal Foster Homes!

By Jeannette McQueen-Nobbs

If you love animals and want to help them you should consider being an animal foster parent. You can volunteer to take animals into your home and take care of them until the rescue can find a "permanent home" for the animal. Most rescues prefer to put dogs in homes where you have a fenced yard, a safe home with ample room for the dogs. If you have children they will consider your children's ages as well. Many small breed dogs aren't always good with small children in the home under 12 years of age.

You will need lots of love, patience, understanding and time for the cats or dogs placed into your home. The animal will probably have some bad traits that you may need to work on as they have may have accidents in the house that you will need to correct or house train them. Also the dogs may have other issues that they will need some training with to make them better pets to potential owners. Whatever basic skills and training you can give the animal will help them become more appealing for their prospective families.

The animal rescue will want to have reports on how the animal is with you, your children and cats, dogs that they get along with. If you don't have any other pets you can take your dog or cat to visit family or friends to see how well they get along with others, their children or pets. You need to see how well the animal interacts with others. If you drive the dog to the park you can record how well the dog travels in the car and how well they interact with other dogs at the park. This helps the animal rescue give new prospective owners information about their future pet so it makes it easier to place the animal in a new home.

Foster parents will also be responsible to take their animal to the vet for vaccinations, spading/neutering, dental care or any other needs of the animal. Most rescue groups pay for these costs so make sure they do before you proceed to do any work on the animals.

Fostering animals is hard work and you can become attached to the animals that you care for but you are helping many animals find good homes instead of being euthanized. It will also bring you great satisfaction that you helped one more animal to find a good quality home and then you can go on to help another.

You will need lots of love, patience, understanding and time for the cats or dogs placed into your home. The animal will probably have some bad traits that you may need to work on as they have may have accidents in the house that you will need to correct or house train them. Also the dogs may have other issues that they will need some training with to make them better pets to potential owners. Whatever basic skills and training you can give the animal will help them become more appealing for their prospective families.

The animal rescue will want to have reports on how the animal is with you, your children and cats, dogs that they get along with. If you don't have any other pets you can take your dog or cat to visit family or friends to see how well they get along with others, their children or pets. You need to see how well the animal interacts with others. If you drive the dog to the park you can record how well the dog travels in the car and how well they interact with other dogs at the park. This helps the animal rescue give new prospective owners information about their future pet so it makes it easier to place the animal in a new home.

Foster parents will also be responsible to take their animal to the vet for vaccinations, spading/neutering, dental care or any other needs of the animal. Most rescue groups pay for these costs so make sure they do before you proceed to do any work on the animals.

Fostering animals is hard work and you can become attached to the animals that you care for but you are helping many animals find good homes instead of being euthanized. It will also bring you great satisfaction that you helped one more animal to find a good quality home and then you can go on to help another.

Jeannette McQueen-Nobbs or Queenie1 has written some articles and was published. She has also written an eBook.

Her blogs are:
http://petsweecare.blogspot.com
http://ancestrynme.blogspot.com

Friday, October 9, 2009

Best Cavy Care Tips to Keep Your Cavy Healthy and Happy For Years

By Joshua Cuccia

There are around thirteen different breeds of Cavy. Some are long haired, some are short, and one of the first to consider with Cavy care, is the necessity for washing.

The long haired breeds of Cavy are going to need more attention in this area, than the short haired breeds. For a shampoo you may use a specially formulated kitten shampoo, freely available from quality pet stores, and naturally your vet. Use this kind of shampoo to avoid any probability of drying out their skin.

When you have bathed your Cavy, confirm she or he is completely dried before returning to the hutch. Cavy care also needs regular clipping of the toenails.

Like their teeth, the toenails are always growing so you must keep a watch on the length and trim when mandatory. Don't clip the nail too short, and the most impressive results can be done by trying the standard nail clipping tool, ensuring not to chop into the fast (the living part of the nail). If you do happen to cut into this area, you can stop the bleeding employing a styptic pencil.

Brushing your guinea pig is another task that you are going to need to do. The ultimate brush to use for this is the standard metal greyhound brush, which penetrates simply to the base of most fur coats. Daily brushing always helps to remove any loose hair, which lessens losing.

Regarding medical and or consultant care as your Cavy grows, search out a vet who focuses on exotic animals. This way you make sure that any cavy care you want, that's outside your own level of expertise, is being handled by someone with the right information about your pet.

The vet can check for bugs, show you the most effective way to do stuff like nail trimming and grooming, and it's a good spot to ask any questions you could have. If you're paying for a wellness check, employ the expense and time productively by asking the vet anything you want or need to understand about providing great cavy care.

There are a couple of things that you should generally be looking for. If your cavy shows any appearances of any of these, you should see your vet as fast as possible. Difficulty breathing, refusal to drink or eat, listlessness, puffing and sneezing, crusty eyes, rough coat, hunched posture, blood in urine, limping, baldness, and/or scratching, and any other unnatural behaviour that might be a concern to you.

Acting quickly can be the difference between your cavy being diagnosed and cured, and the choice, and no-one wants to consider the alternative! Ensure that when and if your cavy does need veterinary assistance for any bacterial sort of infections, the vet doesn't prescribe or use Penicillin based medicine. If you're undecided about a particular drug or drugs, raise questions, and expect a reason BEFORE permitting it to be given to your pet.

Joshua Cuccia is a guinea pig expert. Do You Want To Quickly and Easily Have the Perfect Guinea Pigs: Healthy, Happy, and Thriving For Years to Come? Discover more information about Cavy Care, visit http://www.guineapigcarerevealed.com.

Saturday, October 3, 2009

More Guinea Pig Breads - Hair Types

By Gwen Garrett

As you may have noticed, Guinea pigs have hair, not fur like most other animals. There are three types of hair a guinea may have; long, fuzzy(frizzy), or curly. Lets talk about...

Hair Types

Smooth-Coated

Smooth-haired guinea pigs have, at the risk of repeating myself, smooth coats. The coat lays in the direction from the head down to the tail. The guinea's coat is made of two different layers of hair. The first layer, called the guard hair, forms the top of the coat and is strong, and coarse to the touch. The second layer is composed of much shorter and softer hairs that lay underneath the guard hair. When the guard hair is properly groomed the second layer is much more shiny and soft than the guard layer. Smooth-coated gcavvies come in a variety of colors that can range from a solid color to various multi-color patterns. Some even come in a pattern that has the hair one color from the base of the root and then another at the very tip!

Long-Haired

The hair of a long-haired guinea pig grows at the rate of about an inch per month. Because of this, much trimming is required in order to keep your guinea's hair manageable and clean, if your guinea's hair gets matted, be very very careful when trimming or cutting it. It is hard to tell what part is the piggy's body and what is the hair, you do not want to cut your piggy. There are six different breeds of long haired guinea pigs. Three of these breeds have smooth hair, which all lay in different ways. The other three are simply variations of the first three, including one breed that has long curly hair.

Rosetted Coats

The breeds associated with this particular type of coat are talked about in the breeds article. Rosetted coats come in three particular styles. There is one where the coat is smooth despite the one rosette on the guinea's forehead. There is another whose whole coat is composed of various ridges and rosettes. These rosettes are in an order along the piggy's sides and rear end. The ridges lay in between the rosettes. The third of these types have a thick, frizzy undercoat with long guard hairs. This coat lays in the direction from the rear end to the head, and sticks out, giving the guinea pig a larger-than-normal appearance.

Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Pet Moving - Do's and Dont's

By Deepa RC

Pet shipping can be a real headache! But its for our lovely pets whom we can't leave behind. As these dear creatures of ours can not talk and explain to us what they feel, we have to be all the more careful with pet transportation. How, otherwise, will we keep our lovely companions comfortable and stress free during the whole relocation process? Here are some do's and dont's for pet moving.

Pet Transport Do's

  • Plan Beforehand. Last minute decisions for taking them along result in buying of uncomfortable pet carriers and other bottlenecks.
  • As far as possible, don't change their routine till the day of moving. Walk them, feed them and play with them at the usual time so that they may remain stress free.
  • Get all their medical records from local veterinarian before the moving day. Also verify that these records are up-to-date.
  • On the moving day, leave them with some of your friends to relieve the pressure. They tend to become stressed during the chaos of moving. You can even leave them at day care center.
  • If you don't leave them anywhere, ensure to close the doors and windows of the room where they are placed during the loading of your packed belongings. There is always a possibility of their running out due to stress.
  • If you want to spare yourself from all the worries, you can even hire pet transport services that facilitate door to door relocation by picking up your pet a few days prior to the move and delivering it to your new location on a prescribed date.
  • If you are moving overseas and plan to fly with your pet, inquire about any requirement of airline with this regard. Know the facts about flying with pets.

Pet Transport Dont's

  • Don't travel with a sick pet or one with poor health. Moving stress can lead to their worsened health condition.
  • Don't take them on the moving van with the rest of your things! They are living creatures and can get uncomfortable.
  • Don't fly with puppies and kittens less than eight weeks old. They are not allowed to fly according to rules.
  • Don't buy a carrier that is too hard or uncomfortable. Buy one which is insulated so that your pet may remain comfortable at any temperature.

Deepa RC recommends reading more about pet relocation at http://www.moversandpackers.net/pet-moving.html, the comprehensive directory of movers and packers companies and also a great resource for those moving into their new homes. It contains useful tips and information about the whole relocation process making it easier for everyone to relocate and settle down comfortably at their new destination.

Monday, September 28, 2009

Cleaning Up After Your Pet With a Pet Lover's Shoe

I work in an animal shelter that houses dogs and cats. Being an extreme animal lover, my heart goes out to each and every animal. Part of my job involves caring for sick animals and cleaning up after them. Not too long ago I wore a brand new pair of sneakers to work, and I walked into one of the dog cages, slipped on dog extract and fell. Not only did I ruin my new pair of sixty dollar sneakers, but I hurt my elbow and shoulder as well.

Cleaning up after hundreds of cats and dogs is very difficult work, the pay is very low, but the reward of watching an animal find a new home makes every hour spent here worth it. Animals rely on us humans for so much; food, care, and love to name a few things. After my fall episode, I had to get something on my feet that wouldn't slip so easily and wouldn't cost a fortune, remember, I make just above minimum wage. Two of the ladies that work here wear a shoe specifically for working around animals. It's resistant to all pet related contaminants and they come with a slip resistant sole.

I guess I didn't think about appropriate footwear for working at a shelter too much, but this made sense. My only question was; how long will they last? Both ladies have been wearing theirs for over three years now, five days a week. That was enough to sell me. I have to tell you, if you own animals and have to clean up the yard after your dog, or you work on a farm and are around any kind of poultry, or work in any type of environment where you come in contact with pet contaminants, you need to have something special on your feet.

Boots might be a good choice, but if the weather is warm they will be hot, and they need to be 100% waterproof, and this can make them even hotter. These Muck Boots Muckster Pet Lover's Shoes keep your feet comfortable and dry, and won't degrade from any animal contaminants, and anyone who has spend any significant time around animals knows that fluids or other extract from animals is highly caustic, and I just don't want my feet or socks exposed to any of it, even though I cherish every animal.

Don VanPelt is a writer for Muck Boots Direct who has published many articles about boots. Read his comments and recommendations for the best places to buy Muck Boots Muckster Pet Lover at Muck Boots Direct.

Friday, September 25, 2009

Understanding Why Dogs Bite Or Misbehave

By Basil W Morton

Similar to people, dogs act is such manners when they are restless or just not understood. Dogs are like children, they cannot communicate with your easily and there are only limited actions they can perform to try to get their point across. Dogs crave for attention, and when they perform some action, either good or bad, generally they get some attention from you, it could be negative or positive reaction, but as long as it is some reaction they are likely to replicate that action again.

You have to try to listen and understand the dog's message when it tries to communicate with you. Misunderstanding the messages can lead to frustration not only for the dog itself but to its owner too. One thing that is important to understand which people always overlook is that anything that your dog does is not provoked by guilt or spite, dogs do not portray such type of emotions even though we think that.

A dog acting aggressively is a big red flag. Only in certain cases it is acceptable but mostly it should be seen as a bad sign. Dogs are not trained or programmed to bite humans, and sometimes they still do, this could be due to some action that they see is a big threat against them, or due to some disorder. If one of your dogs is really aggressive or has bitten people, it would be a good idea to get professional help.

Finally, you have to try to be patient when dealing with your dog. You should try to understand what the dog needs and give it proper attention, it may require some effort, but in the end it will be really worth it.

Basil has interest in different types of curtains and home accessories. Be sure to visit Retro Shower Curtain and Hookless shower curtain for more information.

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Protect Your Pet With a GPS Pet Locator

By Adam Webster

If your dog is a part of your family, then you want to do all that you can to protect him or her. One of the most helpless feelings is to walk back to a kennel to bring your friend in for the evening and the kennel to be empty. If you have ever experienced this situation, then you can appreciate the GPS pet locator.

In another scenario, perhaps your pet spends most of her day inside with you, but one day someone rings the doorbell. As you open the door to let your guest into the house, your pet runs out the door and is gone before you can call her back into the house.

A GPS pet locator uses the same technology of a GPS unit in your car. It can give the location or your pet to within fifty feet.

The units are fitted into a collar that is your pet should wear at all times. Currently these collars are not small enough for miniature of small dogs. They work best with medium or large breeds. Some of the newer locators solve this problem by allowing you to attach the locator to your pets own collar.

There are two types of GPS protection available for your pet. With the first, you set a boundary where your pet is allowed to roam. If the pet crosses that boundary, then you are sent an alert by phone and e-mail that your pet has crossed. You can track the pet with a mobile phone or online.

The second type of unit does not set a boundary, but anytime you cannot find your pet missing, you call the alert number and the pet's location is relayed to you.

There are some limitations to GPS pet locators. Some terrain causes them to not work as well as they do in others. In addition, some of the locators do not work for the smaller dogs.

For most areas and medium to large pets, a GPS pet locator is a great device.

Some pet locators have a button on the device that can be pressed if your pet if found by a stranger. The device sends a signal of a lost pet to the monitor company. This is an additional security measure other than setting a boundary for your pet.

When a pet is missing people offer large rewards for that pets return. Instead, you could take defensive action and provide your pet with a GPS pet locator for about one hundred dollars plus a small monthly service charge.

In addition to a pet getting out of his or her kennel or the door, today, we have the worry of pet thieves. There are people that will steal you dog to sell to someone else. If your pet has a GPS pet locator around his or her neck, the likelihood of recovery is much greater.

Why not give the best protection available to make sure that you can find a lost pet. That dog will come home with its tail wagging.

Not all GPS Pet locator collars are the same. Find out why Love My Pets GPS, GPS Pet Locators are better.

Monday, September 21, 2009

The 5 Easiest Ways of Ferret Proofing a Room

By Seth Evans

Ferrets get along well with humans, all because they can easily relate and adapt. A conducive environment is ideal especially if you are about to own a ferret for the very first time. Ferret proofing a room is also necessary to keep things well organized. Accidents and ferret-related troubles would also be avoided in time.

Ferret proofing a room is a must if you want to impose organization and propriety in your space or living area. Many accidents have occurred due to lack of concern or mere disregard for details. Ferrets are very curious pets and most of the time, you can see them playing with their owners, sleeping or exploring small openings as if it's playtime. To avoid unnecessary troubles and accidents, it is best to do the following steps before owning or bringing home your ferret pet.

1. Try to have one specific area for your pet. If this is not possible, ferret proofing a room away from the laundry or kitchen area is definitely advised. The said spaces are usual grounds of ferret accidents and one great way to lessen your worries is to place your pet in an environment where he can freely do what he wants.

2. Windows screens and open spaces are great mediums for ferret escapes. Prevent these instances by locking doors and windows or by means of utilizing locks in their cages. Surprisingly, ferrets can easily figure their way out by means of openings such as windows and dryer vents. So, it is always better to secure these openings.

3. Your choice of appliance can also affect ferret safety. Many long-term ferret owners know that laundry areas are like pits of danger for ferrets. Ferret proofing a room means a lot of work but the idea of accidentally dumping your dirty clothes along with your ferret is enough reason to veer their attention away from your washer. Keeping your laundry baskets close as well as trash bins likewise help.

4. Couches and sofas are like toys for ferrets. They usually hide beneath these types of furniture without necessarily minding the consequences. Rocking chairs and recliners also pose a threat to ferrets. Furthermore, it is strongly advised to inspect cushions and have them immediately repaired if chewed on by ferrets.

5. Ferret proofing a room also means restricting access to kitchen areas as much as possible. Do not leave your ferrets unattended. Organize your dirty kitchen and keep all cleaning supplies in a well-secured place. Cover electric wires and cords with plastic enclosures. It is also best to regularly inspect wall openings and cupboards to avoid minor accidents.

Want More? Get Your FREE Secrets to Having a Healthy, Happy, Well-Behaved and Long Lived Ferret Mini eCourse:

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Seth Evans is ferret enthusiast, if you would like more great information on Proofing a Ferret please visit http://www.ferrets-as-pets.com/ Don't forget to claim your FREE eCourse!

Sunday, September 20, 2009

How to Build a Rabbit Hutch

By Kenny Leones

Having a rabbit inside your residence means that you have to construct a secure and comfortable home for it. Building a rabbit hutch will answer that problem. It is a very simple endeavor that you will love doing and your pet will love living in it.

MATERIALS NEEDED IN BUILDING A RABBIT HUTCH

The materials that you needed for this project are wire sheets, wire cloth, eight metals rods, hinges, formica sheet, two by four stock, staples and solder.

TOOLS

The tools needed are screw driver, wire snips, gloves, coping saw, staple gun and soldering iron.

STEPS IN BUILDING A RABBIT HUTCH

The usual size for a hutch should be 4 times the size of your pet. You can use different materials but do not forget that there are some smells that permeates from any pet. It is advisable to use metal instead of wood as the latter retains smell. But a wooden enclosure presents a more interesting aesthetic in an open area while a metal enclosure may be a favorable choice in a confined area.

A wire mesh is a terrific option for the roof and walls of the enclosure but do not utilize for the floor as it will be dangerous for the paws of your pet. A wire cloth is a better option than a wire mesh as it will also allow your pet's urine to filter out of the set-up. Use snips to carefully cut the flooring to the required size.

You can a wire mesh for the walls whether you use a metal or wood rod frame. But you should remember to use a soldering iron if you chose a metal frame and staple gun if you chose a wood frame for your pet's protection. Carefully lay down the frames that you have picked to use. Divide the frames to the size needed. For a metal frame, solder the side walls and then connect the front and back rods.

Determine the entrance location from same board or rod and place a rod on both sides of the entrance location. Build a door frame to match the entrance size. Screw the door hinges and door latch to the entrance and frame. For a frame made out of metal, place the mesh onto the hutch frame that you have made. Fix any bumps that you will see.

Secure the pair of corner points with a soldering iron. Normally, you will just need 2 pairs of wire wall: the entrance, roof and the wall of the floor. For additional floor protection, cut two by four stock to serve as the enclosure's feet. Secure it with staples.

Rabbits frequently urinate, so cut a portion of Formica to the size needed and insert it under the enclosure. You now have a place where your pet will enjoy living in for a long time.

Please click these links if you want to know more about how to build a rabbit hutch or how to build a rabbit hutch in general.

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Saving Money on Pet Meds

Medications for your pet can often cost just as much or even more than a prescription for a person. Pets can't normally take over the counter medications like people do. Most vets stock the medicines your pet may need but there are places to get them cheaper.

Unlike prescriptions for people, medications for animals can usually be bought without a written prescription. Many retailers carry generic versions of vaccines and wormers but for antibiotics or pain relievers such as arthritis medication; you are going to need to go to a licensed seller.

Many online specialty retailers offer the medications your pet needs. It is important to be sure the medications they offer are the same as the one your vet recommended. You don't want to give the wrong medicine to your pet as this may make him sicker or not help at all.

Some of the more common Pet Meds you can find at a discounted price online include flea medications, heartworm pills, supplements, and pain relievers. It may not always be possible to find antibiotics or high does pain relievers online; these you may actually need to purchase from the vet.

If you are only looking for supplements, be sure to check with your local pet store. Pet stores often carry their own versions of supplements- many carry other brands of flea medications as well. If you are looking for supplements, the pet store will probably be okay but if you need flea medications or pain relievers, you want to get the brands recommended by your vet. They may cost a little more than the store brands but they are also more effective which will save you money in the long run.

John K Vincent is an expert website analyst and professional blogger.

Monday, September 14, 2009

Diarrhea in Pet Rabbits

By Andrew Massaro

Rabbits, like most other mammals, can at one point or another develop diarrhea. Diarrhea is not especially common in adult rabbits, and if observed, it means your rabbit has developed some sort of health or diet problem. What follows will review the various causes of diarrhea in your baby or adult rabbit.

In baby rabbits, there are two likely causes of a runny stool. The first potential cause is that the bunny is being weaned from his mother's milk at too early of an age. Many breeders and pet stores sell baby bunnies before they are old enough to be off of their mother's milk. This is unhealthy for the rabbit and diarrhea can be one of the ramifications. The other potential cause is intestinal parasites such as coccidia. If your baby rabbit has diarrhea, you should immediately take him or her to the vet.

In adult rabbits, there are a few more possible causes of diarrhea. One potential cause is that your rabbit is obese. He may be producing cecotropes as usual, but because of his ungainly weight, he is unable to reach them as they are produced and subsequently he smears them all over the place creating a diarrhea-like effect. Another potential cause is that your rabbit has arthritis and is unable to reach his cecotropes he is in constant pain. Again this will result in your rabbit smearing his feces around his bottom.

Two different dietary issues could also cause diarrhea in your rabbit. A diet that is too high in starch and sugary fruits can cause your rabbit to have mushy stools. Another potential cause is that your rabbit is not getting enough fiber in his food. These can both be easily remedied by appropriately adjusting your rabbit's diet.

If the preceding were determined not to be the cause of your rabbit's diarrhea, then it is likely that he has some other health problem that can only be properly diagnosed by a qualified veterinarian. Seek medical assistance as soon as possible.

When it comes to the health and happiness of your pet rabbit, choosing a quality living environment should be on the top of your list. Whether you choose quality Rabbit Cages or opt for larger Rabbit Hutches, the quality of the materials and the construction of the dwelling will determine how well it works for your particular furry friend.

Saturday, September 12, 2009

Dwarf Hamster Aquarium

Yes the aquarium that you would keep fish in makes a great home for your pet dwarf hamster, of course minus the fish and the water!  There are two types of aquarium construction, glass or plastic and each has their advantages and disadvantages.

A 10 gallon aquarium minimum size for one pet and use a larger  size if housing two or a mother with a litter.  Benefits of using an aquarium to house your pet::

  • As the sides are of smooth  construction, it makes it more difficult to escape
  • Provides opportunity for you to observe your pet and their antics and opportunity for you pet to observe their outside surroundings

Generally aquariums are made from two types of construction, glass or plastic.The benefit of a glass aquarium is that is the glass doesn't scratch as easily should your pet decided to scratch at the glass.  However the weight of a glass aquarium can make it more difficult to move around and to take care that nothing is tossed against the sides as it could shatter the glass.  Plastic construction is lighter weight making it easier to move and relocate however tends to show scratches easier and is more break proof should it be dropped or something tossed against it.

When using an aquarium for you pets home you will need to make use of a breathable lid.  They can come in different types consisting plastic with holes or screen construction. Using a lid is important for many reasons:

  • Should you pet decide to pile up their bedding to assist them to climb up to the top of the aquarium the lid will deter escape
  • Helps to stop things falling or being dropped into their home
  • Helps keep other pets from entering their home, such as a pet cat!

Location of your dwarf hamster aquarium is important.  As the sides are of solid construction, make sure it is not placed in direct sunlight as it can heat up quickly inside making it unsafe for your pet.  Always avoid locating any pets home in drafty areas, close to heaters, air vents or where there is no indirect sunlight.

One necessary item your pet will require is a water bottle that they can sip from.  By using Velcro pads, you can attach the bottle at the perfect height for your pet.  Also available at pet stores you will find water bottle hooks that are specifically designed to hook onto the top of the aquarium. 

As dwarf hamsters, generally prefer to be observed than held or touched, using a large aquarium creates a great opportunity for your family to observe your pets daily activities and their funny antics!

Kym Sutherland is an author and enjoys writing articles that benefit dwarf hamster owners. To see an example of a dwarf hamster aquarium being used, come to the website, http://www.DwarfHamsterGuide.com and sign up for the free newsletter. See you soon!

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

Paralysis Ticks - Prevention is Better Than Cure

By Margaret Selga

A very important parasite in east coast Australia is the paralysis tick. This small, insignificant looking parasite will be familiar to many in Australia, it does not occur in the UK. Ixodes holocyclus is the scientific name and they are prevalent mostly in the warmer months but for those in SEQLD that means all year round. We are already seeing tick cases in our practice so for those of you that think you don't have to worry in winter...think again.

The cornerstone with paralysis tick is PREVENTION. This is very important and there are a number of products available to help with this. Spot - on products like frontline, advantix and others as well as collars can be used. I usually recommend a spot-on every two weeks and a collar, changed every 4-6 weeks. Please remember that no product is 100% reliable and DAILY checking of your pet is essential in the fight against the effects of this parasite.

If you locate a tick on your pet, pull it off straight away. Don't worry about "leaving the head in" as this does not appear to be an issue. Just get it off asap and watch out for any clinical signs.
Clinical signs of envenomation can be varied. Usual signs can be wobbliness in the legs, coughing or change in voice, vomiting or gagging among other signs. If you notice any of these signs you must get your pet to a vet as soon as possible. If you are in any doubt call your vet for advice.

Treatment involves giving your pet an infusion of tick serum which is a type of antivenom. This will help stop the progression of clinical signs. Your pet then needs time to recover from the effects of both the venom and the antivenom.

Tick venom can have wide reaching effects on your pet and recovery can often be complicated. Each case is different and your vet is best placed to advise you on what is best for your pet.

In summary...prevention is the key, careful checking of your pet daily, quick removal of ticks and seek veterinary advice asap if you are concerned about symptoms. Remember, ticks can kill if left unnoticed and untreated.

Monday, September 7, 2009

Let Our Pet Go Organic - How Your Pet Can Go Organic

By John Hanly

Let Your Pet Go Organic!

From skin irritations and dull coats to constipation and lack of energy, your pet's food can be hurting, or even worse, killing him. Chances are if you're feeding your pet from those commercial bags, boxes or cans, he and you, are getting a lot more than you bargained for.

One of the first ingredients in most commercial pet food is meat by products or "meat meal." What exactly is that? Unfortunately, it isn't a plump chicken leg or ground tenderloin. Instead, its the parts of the animals that are unfit for consumption. Lungs, spleens, bones, beaks, and other scraps that are leftover after all of the actual meat has been picked from the bone.

How about the boiled flesh of dead, diseased, disabled or dying animals?
What if those animals included dogs and cats?

How can this be?
Well it all comes down to the mighty dollar.
And speaking of that dollar, doesn't it stand to reason that the big pet food manufacturers want their products to have the longest shelf life possible so that there's no waste and no lost profit?
Of course it does!
Guess what gives that extended shelf life...harmful preservatives. And along with those preservatives are herbicides, pesticides and let's not forget the chemicals that were used to euthanize the sick and dying animals that wound up in that bag of food you've been feeding your beloved pet.
Yes, the same chemicals that are used to kill animals are being fed to animals.

So what can you do to protect your best friend?

There are a couple of alternatives that are not only safer, but will help your little Fido to thrive.

If you're up for it, you can pick up some books on pet nutrition and research the proper diet and nutrients for your pet's health and then cook for him at home. While this may sound like a great idea (after all, who better than you to control the freshness and wholesomeness of your pet's food?) it's not as easy as it sounds. Dogs and cats need a special diet that includes and excludes various foods and amounts of those foods. Its pretty scientific stuff and unless you're willing to spend the time learning how and what to prepare, home-cooking might not be the best avenue.

A better solution is to go organic. Organic pet food manufacturers care about your pet's health and to prove it, they don't opt for cheap, dangerous ingredients. Instead they leave out the byproducts, steroids, chemical additives, artificial colors, dyes, artificial flavors, bulk fillers like corn and wheat (which can irritate the digestive system), antibiotics, pesticides and other harmful and useless ingredients.

Organic product manufacturers have to follow strict guidelines to become certified, and that process not only includes inspection of what goes into the products, but also, where and how they are made!

Aside from the obvious, here are a few more important plusses to feeding organic:

Shinier, softer coats
Less skin irritations
More energy
Regular bowel movements
Healthier teeth
Increased longevity
Healthy weight maintenance

These are just some of the health benefits that organic foods offer our pets.

With the variety of ways organic foods can impact our pets, our environment and our own bodies, doesn't it just make sense to make the switch?

For more information on this and other pet related topics, please visit http://www.mypetresources.info

Saturday, September 5, 2009

Why to Collar and Leash Your Pet

By John Hanly

Collars, Leashes and Harnesses

Not only for your pet's safety and for the safety of those around you, but because it's usually the law...leash up!
That's right, most U.S. cities require that while out walking, dogs are kept under control and wear I. D. tags that show proof of rabies shots.

Since Fido should be leashed and probably has to be leashed, then it only makes sense that you should make sure you have the right walking accessories for your pet.

And hey, while you're at it, you may as well make sure he looks his best too!

So what's it gonna be? Neck collar or Harness?

To help you make an informed decision, here are a few points to consider.

What's the difference?

Everyday collars (as opposed to metal training collars which are not discussed in this article) come in a variety of colors and prints in both leather and nylon. Because they're cost effective when the need to replace them for a bigger size arises, nylon collars are more practical for growing puppies. Since leather collars are stronger, more durable and longer lasting, they tend to cost a bit more and are best suited for the full grown dog.

Opt for a buckle collar rather than the snap-shut kind. The buckled collars stay closed while the snap-shut ones are more likely to come undone.

Be sure to fit the collar properly.

The rule of thumb, so to speak, is the "two-finger-fit." What that means is that the collar should be tight enough for you to fit two fingers between it and your dog's neck. Too loose and it may slip off - too tight and - well, let's just say that you wouldn't like wearing a tight collar around your neck all day; would you?

Another option, and what I consider to be a kinder, gentler one, is the harness. While harnesses may not be ideal for training purposes because they don't provide the instant control that a tug of a collar does, they are a great alternative to a neck collar.

Older dogs especially, due to aches and pains and neck issues, can really benefit from the harness because it attaches around the chest rather than putting pressure on the neck.

Leashes

Just like collars, leashes (leads) come in leather and nylon. They're also available in cotton. Again, like the nylon collar, nylon leads work best for puppies. They're lightweight and easily replaced without breaking the bank. Do expect to replace the first one because eventually, your puppy will discover they make GREAT chew toys. Again, expect to replace the first one - and quite honestly, maybe the second one as well.

As your dog matures to full grown height and weight, you might consider switching to the leather variety. Not only is the leather more comfortable in your hand, it's also a wise investment that will last a long, long time.

When choosing the length of your lead remember this - Leads are Control. You are the boss and the closer your dog is to you, the more control you have over him.

Retractable Leashes

If you've got a wide open, safe environment in which you're comfortable allowing your dog to venture about fifteen free-feeling feet from you, then by all means, purchase a retractable leash. Remember, these leashes and those distances are best saved for open spaces where your dog can't turn corners before you or run into danger that you can't see coming.

For More Information on this and other pet related topics, visit http://www.mypetresources.info

For More information visit http://www.mypetresources.info.

Wednesday, September 2, 2009

Diarrhea in Pet Rabbits

By Andrew Massaro

Rabbits, like most other mammals, can at one point or another develop diarrhea. Diarrhea is not especially common in adult rabbits, and if observed, it means your rabbit has developed some sort of health or diet problem. What follows will review the various causes of diarrhea in your baby or adult rabbit.

In baby rabbits, there are two likely causes of a runny stool. The first potential cause is that the bunny is being weaned from his mother's milk at too early of an age. Many breeders and pet stores sell baby bunnies before they are old enough to be off of their mother's milk. This is unhealthy for the rabbit and diarrhea can be one of the ramifications. The other potential cause is intestinal parasites such as coccidia. If your baby rabbit has diarrhea, you should immediately take him or her to the vet.

In adult rabbits, there are a few more possible causes of diarrhea. One potential cause is that your rabbit is obese. He may be producing cecotropes as usual, but because of his ungainly weight, he is unable to reach them as they are produced and subsequently he smears them all over the place creating a diarrhea-like effect. Another potential cause is that your rabbit has arthritis and is unable to reach his cecotropes he is in constant pain. Again this will result in your rabbit smearing his feces around his bottom.

Two different dietary issues could also cause diarrhea in your rabbit. A diet that is too high in starch and sugary fruits can cause your rabbit to have mushy stools. Another potential cause is that your rabbit is not getting enough fiber in his food. These can both be easily remedied by appropriately adjusting your rabbit's diet.

If the preceding were determined not to be the cause of your rabbit's diarrhea, then it is likely that he has some other health problem that can only be properly diagnosed by a qualified veterinarian. Seek medical assistance as soon as possible.

When it comes to the health and happiness of your pet rabbit, choosing a quality living environment should be on the top of your list. Whether you choose quality Rabbit Cages or opt for larger Rabbit Hutches, the quality of the materials and the construction of the dwelling will determine how well it works for your particular furry friend.